Sunday, 13 October 2019

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By Stijn Mitzer

The war against Islamic State in Iraq has seen a myriad of DIY designs come to life as factions attempted to improve their firepower to gain the advantage over the enemy. The Islamic State (IS) is certainly no exception, and its forces in Iraq relied virtually exclusively on the ingenuity of their many arms workshops to turn the huge arsenals captured in Mosul into deadly weapons for use on the ever changing battlegrounds of Iraq.

Sunday, 6 October 2019

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By Stijn Mitzer

Notes:

- If several configurations of a missile, rocket or launcher are known, they are added as such.

- The part within the apostrophes refers to other designations or an unofficial designation.

- When available, the date of inception and range are added. As this list mostly relies on data reported by Iranian sources, the date of inception and range should be used as a rough indication rather than a precise estimate.

Although a great deal of effort has been put into ensuring the accuracy of this list, any updates or corrections to this list are most welcome.

(Click on the equipment to get a picture of them in Iranian service)

Wednesday, 25 September 2019

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By Stijn Mitzer

This list only includes Iranian-supplied arms and equipment supplied to Houthi militants in Yemen or interdicted on the way to Yemen after the 2015 Saudi Arabian-led intervention in Yemen.

Notes:

- Iran has set up a network of smuggling routes through Oman, the Arabian and Red Sea and Somalia to transport arms and equipment to Houthi militants in Yemen.
 
- While some of the ships containing Iranian-supplied arms and equipment intended for Houthi militants list Somalia as their ultimate destination, most of the weaponry is delivered by ship-to-ship transfers in the Arabian and Red Sea. Deliveries to Somalia and then onward to Yemen make up the rest of the transfers.

- This list only contains a small fraction of the true numbers of arms and equipment that reached Yemen, and Iranian efforts in arming the Houthis should not be underestimated.

- This list does not include items such as cables or specific components of missiles or equipment.

- The part within apostrophes refers to an unoffical name, such as the US DoD xxx designation system.

(Click on the equipment to get a picture of them in Houthi service or after being captured during transport to Yemen.)

Friday, 20 September 2019

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By Stijn Mitzer

The goal of this list is to comprehensively catalogue Iran's past and current inventory of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and their armament. In an effort to streamline the list and avoid unnecessary confusion, this list only includes military drones associated with Iran's defence industry or military-grade UAVs with at least some chance of entering service.

Monday, 16 September 2019

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By Stijn Mitzer

The YPG is well known for operating a large fleet of Do-It-Yourself (DIY) armoured fighting vehicles (AFVs) and other up-armoured battle monstrosities throughout the Northern Syrian theatre of conflict. Having performed these upgrades on a range of armoured fighting and support vehicles in the past years, the YPG has now begun fabricating its own true armour by introducing a new type of armoured personnel carrier (APC), designated the BMB (either you get it, or you don't) in this article.

Friday, 6 September 2019

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By Stijn Mitzer

This list only includes equipment confirmed to be in service with Houthi militants in Yemen or interdicted on the way to Yemen. The goal of this list is to comprehensively catalogue the current inventory of drones, rockets and missiles of the Houthi militants as well as clarify their origin

Notes:

- If several configurations of a vehicle with one designation are known, they are added as such.

- When the origin of a piece of equipment is unknown, it is indicated as such.

- The part within apostrophes refers to an unoffical name, such as the US DoD xxx designation system.

(Click on the equipment to get a picture of them in Houthi service.)

Saturday, 24 August 2019

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By Stijn Mitzer

With SyrianAir's sole A340 aircraft marking more than two years of successful operations to destinations in North Africa, the Middle East and Russia, photos posted on SyrianAir's website reveal interesting details on the operations of an airline that had nearly succumbed to years of sanctions. After years of scaling back its operations due to a slow degradation process that would see SyrianAir retiring ever more aircraft as spare parts became increasingly difficult to acquire, SyrianAir is now expanding its operations amidst an increasingly stable security situation in all of Syria's major population centres.

Thursday, 22 August 2019

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By Stijn Mitzer

Notes:

- Click on the equipment to get a picture of them in Cuban service.

- If several configurations of a vehicle with one designation are known, they are added as such.

Abbrevations:

Wednesday, 14 August 2019

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By Stijn Mitzer

Transnistria, officially known as the Pridnestrovian Moldavian Republic (PMR), is a breakaway state in Eastern Europe that has remained in the shadows ever since its self-proclaimed independence as a Soviet republic in 1990 and subsequent violent breakaway from Moldova in 1992. Despite having ended armed conflict that same year, the situation in Transnistria remains extremely complicated, with the the breakaway state wishing to join Russia (which maintains a local peacekeeping mission) while continuing to remain heavily reliant on Moldova for exporting the limited produce its economy outputs. Nevertheless, Transnistria functions as a de-facto state with its own military and even air arm.

Saturday, 13 July 2019

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By Stijn Mitzer

The Islamic State's rise to the status of one of the most sophisticated designated terrorist groups ever to exist has been accompanied by an unprecedented level of ingenuity, especially considering the fact that most of their sites and weaponry were quickly targeted by Air Forces operating over the conflicted battlespaces of Syria and Iraq. In an attempt to address this threat the Islamic State resorted to desperate measures such as using conventional artillery as makeshift anti-aircraft guns, relying on the remote chance of achieving a direct hit on enemy aircraft flying high in the sky to bring them down.