Wednesday, 15 January 2014

A Visual Guide to North Korea’s Fighting Vehicles


By Joost Oliemans and Stijn Mitzer

Click on the equipment to get a picture of them in North Korean service.

Notes:

- If several configurations of a vehicle with one designation are known, they are added as such.

- The part within apostrophes refers to an unoffical name, such as the US DoD M-xxxx designation system (referring to the first year the system was identified).

- A year in square brackers after the designation of a vehicle refer to its perceived date of inception.

- All vehicles listed are presumed to still be in use with the Korean People's Army.

- All vehicles listed are presumed to still be in use with the Korean People's Army unless indicated.

- Last updated on 14-03-2017.

 

Tanks

 

Infantry fighting vehicles

  • BMP-1 ''Korshun'' (Not yet seen)
  • BTR-80A 


Armoured personnel carriers

Reconnaissance vehicles


Military engineering vehicles

 

Command vehicles

 

Amphibious transports


Heavy mortars


Self-propelled mortars


Tank destroyers


Towed artillery

 

Self-propelled artillery


Multiple rocket launchers

 

Towed anti-aircraft guns

 

Self-propelled anti-aircraft guns

 

Self-propelled SAM systems

 

Static SAM systems

 

Coastal Defence Missile Systems

Artillery Rockets

 

Ballistic Missiles

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)

  • Tupolev DR-3 / M-141 Reys (Documented by a few sources, not yet seen)
  • Shmel-1 (Documented by a few sources, not yet seen)  
  • Unknown UCAV (Can also be carried on a trailer

 

Radars


Trucks

 

Jeeps

Recommended Articles

The Oryx Handbook of Cuban Fighting Vehicles
  

15 comments:

  1. hi,
    great work.
    found these links with some informations and pictures:

    http://blog.naver.com/PostView.nhn?blogId=zx5065&logNo=120185903619
    http://blog.naver.com/ds1jxm/40158719154

    greetings
    a.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for your feedback, we did indeed use some of the information found on blog.naver.com as you can see in the "special thanks to" section at the bottom.

      If you have any more questions/suggestions, please don't hesitate to let us know!

      Delete
  2. http://i.imgur.com/28EfxL6.png

    ReplyDelete
  3. Fascinating blog. I just stumbled across it. Very well done!

    ReplyDelete
  4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9aVS3LpjPyA
    0:15 120mm "M-1992" Self-propelled mortars
    0:18 122mm (Indigenous D-74) Chuch'ep'o "M-1991"
    I think,this picture is very rare.
    From japan.

    ReplyDelete
  5. DPRK's have 2version HOME MADE BTR(8×8).
    Deference is side of body.
    Version1 is equipped with a side port similar to BTR80.
    Version2 is equipped with a side port similar to BTR80A.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Last unknown truck: Volvo F88 (many were exported to GDR, btw.)

    ReplyDelete
  7. The Gereman provenience of the Volvo trucks was only my guess. Many F88 were purchased by the GDR from Sweden in the late 60ies/early 70ies. Maybe the Koreans got ahold of them, when they were phased out prior or shortly after the German unification.
    But the DPRK could also bought the trucks directly from Sweden (just like the GDR did) or got them from another third party.

    ReplyDelete
  8. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dPB76SIO_0&feature=youtu.be&t=2395

    can you identify the system at 40:18
    the three barrelled thing on the left, looks to be some sort of MLRS
    any ideas?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That link doesn't lead to it, but I'm assuming you mean this 370mm beast:
      http://s29.postimg.org/5uyuoubjr/image.png
      It's a triple-barreled recoilless gun carrier, a prototype of which was built in 1984.

      Delete
  9. Has your book, NORTH KOREA'S ARMED FORCES. ON THE PATH OF SONGUN is been published?
    someone tell me, it`s not yet and keep delaying.

    ReplyDelete
  10. AK-74 or version NK coupled with a rifle swivel-sliding shutter

    http://i.imgur.com/QqBIwgb.jpg?1
    http://i.imgur.com/10fZDgl.jpg?1

    ReplyDelete
  11. All right keep up the good work !

    ReplyDelete